Hackademix.net's reader "John Drinkwater" just informed me that the BBC News' "Click" TV magazine aired yesterday (March 27th 2009) had one whole minute dedicated to NoScript (from 20'30" to 21'30", already cut and embedded below).

The general mood does not sound defamatory, but the online audio quality is not gentle enough to my untrained Italian ears :P
Would any English native speaker (better if of pure British lineage) be so kind to contribute a transcription? Many thanks!!!
Long time noscripter therube, less lazy than me, found BBC's own official transcription:

NoScript

noscript.net

Browser plug-ins like Java, Flash and Silverlight offer functionality, compatibility, and a load of other bells and whistles we have come to expect from our web browsing experience nowadays. But they have their downsides too.

You'll no doubt have heard talk about malicious code embedded in certain plug-ins, so if you want to be sure of being totally safe online, this nice little plug-in I found for Mozilla-based browsers should help you sleep better at night. It physically blocks any codes from running unless you give your express permission to do so.

It can also be handy if you're running on a slow connection and don't want loads of movies and animations trying to launch into the page you're accessing. Equally, many marketing organisations will run applets in the background that tell them when you're using their site, and how.

Download and install take literally seconds and then you'll see a noscript icon in the bottom right hand corner of your browser window. Each time you visit a new web page, if it tries to load any scripts the applet will block these and alert you. Clicking the noscript icon now will allow you to block or allow certain scripts on the page. Individual panels in the web page which are blocked can also be right clicked to allow you to set the permissions for that particular script.

15 Responses to “NoScript on BBC News!”

  1. #1 therube says:

    The video (video display itself) is squashed for me (here)?
    The player itself looks fine.

    Transcript: http://forums.informaction.com/viewtopic.php?p=667#p667

  2. #2 Aerik says:

    Browser plugins like java, flash and silverlight, offer functionality, combatibility, and basically a whole load of other bells and whistles we've come to expect from our web browsing experience. But, they have their downsides, too.

    This nice little plugin I found for Mozilla-based browsers should help you sleep better at night as if physically blocks any codes from running unless you give them express permission to do so. It can also be handy if you're running on a slow connection and you don't want lots of movies and animations trying to launch onto the page you're accessing. Equally, many marketing organisations will run applets in the background that tell them when you're using their site and how.

    Download and install takes literally seconds, and then you'll see a NoScript icon in the bottom right-hand corner of your browser window. Each time you visit a new web page, if it tries to load any script, the applet will block these and alert you.

    [seque] Math was never fun...

  3. #3 Giorgio says:

    @therube and especially Aerik (for the extra effort):
    many thanks!

    @therube:
    define "squashed"? Which WMP version are you using, if any?

  4. #4 Aerik says:

    I could never get .asx/wmv files to play in any version of firefox ever. And this includes two different installs of windows. Same thing with anything that requires the quicktime plugin. Instead I downloaded this video so I can stretch out the seek bar and listen to any minute detail again.

  5. #5 therube says:

    SeaMonkey 2, WMP 10, npdsplay.dll, XP.
    Squashed like HD format?

    SeaMonkey 1, WMP 10, NP-MSWMP.dll, XP (same machine as above)
    Looks normal.

    (Hadn't checked SM1 when I posted, so likely a SM2 issue?)

    Pictures, http://i44.tinypic.com/245xc40.jpg
    (Notice the location of the ABP Block object.)

  6. #6 therube says:

    Oh, & the same did display correctly from the BBC webpage in SeaMonkey 2.

  7. #7 Alan Baxter says:

    "but the online audio quality is not gentle enough to my untrained Italian ears :P"

    It was painful to my American ones. 'Twas Greek to me, so thank you for the transcript.

  8. #8 GµårÐïåñ says:

    Cool, I know that I plug you every chance I get, glad to see others doing it too ;)

  9. #9 meathive says:

    Congrats, man. Hard work pays off.

  10. #10 AndrewM says:

    There's better quality audio and video on the programme's website (the NoScript bit is 1:07 in):

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/click_online/7968725.stm

  11. #11 Musback says:

    Hi

    I love your piece of software, NoScript... and wish to thank you a billion x for it!
    BHowever.... I dont mean to complain, but could you please give the (seemingly daily?) updates a little rest? every day i start my Firefox and i have to wait over 2 minutes (slow internet) before it updated :'(

    but i LOVE what you created, and please, never stop :D

  12. #12 March says:

    ::You are at this page because you loaded the JavaScript free version of ::reCAPTCHA, but it looks like you have JavaScript. We need to prevent ::this for security reasons. If you are testing out the JavaScript-free ::version, turn off JavaScript in your browser.

    oh, a new website, hmm ok, right-click...no you're not digg.com, umm, you're not a blocked object, allow hackademix.net..ther eyou are.

    I have been using NoScript since it first came out. I have also been updating it since it first came out. Im done with daily updates. I turned them off tonight. I kept seeing the word "Vulnerabilities" everytime the update page showed up. I get it, the internet is not like it used to be. But, updating and clicking allow is still as much work as pushing allow on any protection program made for browsers. Honestly, if I wasn't a tech, lets say i was my mom, i wouldn't know wheter to allow google analytics to run a site or not. My life now includes google more than it used to because i keep seeing it pop up. This is for the new "no you're just mad, stop hating, just click auto updates off and shush, no no this program is so good i love it! my browser is now mine!!" ...ok I understand all sides, really. But take a look of this picture I made. You will understand my prospective a little more.

    Images:

    http://img4.imageshack.us/img4/6055/noscriptno.jpg

  13. #13 Giorgio says:

    @March:
    Your perspective is still quite hard to understand to me, but maybe it's my fault.

    1. While we do work very hard at making NoScript better and development builds sometimes are daily (but you need to install them manually), automatic updates are not daily like you say. Just look at AMO's version history: latest update came out 10 days later than previous version.
    2. I'm not sure about the point you're trying to make with your picture, but the current version is on the query string to allow customization of announcements, e.g. when there's some version-specific bug fixed by a development build.
  14. #14 Motomito says:

    I can understand people with slow connections getting frustrated with constant updates, but in that case you have the option to skip them and simply update on your own chosen 'Patch Tuesday' at the frequency you want. Perhaps hackers could be encouraged to only devise new exploits on a given day once a month to save us all this trouble. Grazie mille Giorgio.

  15. #15 html says:

    fck you, i prefer adblock

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